Author Topic: The Enneagram Thread  (Read 1243 times)

Etudiant

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The Enneagram Thread
« on: August 03, 2015, 06:30:57 PM »
I've looked into my enneagram type for the first time and I'm definitely a type 7w8 with a sexual/attraction interest.

Very interesting reading about my enneagram type, the description of someone who is restless and always seeking the next bit of adventure describes me well.  I'm not too sure what the next step to take with this bit of information is - should I embrace that part of me, or look to temper it to be more content living a 'standard' settled life??

Etudiant

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Re: The Enneagram Thread
« Reply #1 on: August 03, 2015, 06:31:41 PM »
Also for what it's worth my MBTI is ENTJ, which seems to be an unusual combination of enneagram and MBTI.

Brian

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Re: The Enneagram Thread
« Reply #2 on: August 03, 2015, 09:17:41 PM »
I find psychometrics like Enneagrams and the MTBI are really useful for coaching.  Ultimately, they are caricatures of the client and putting too much stock in them could cause me to miss nuances, but they give me a good starting point for figuring out how to best engage them.  For example, I know my own type 4w5 works best when they have a lot of projects on the go and can switch, so if I were coaching myself (which I do), I would create several very different assignments, and get my client to handle tasks by picking three diferent parts to work on as they see fit.

My MTBI index is INFP... which likely surprises noone,.
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Mitch K

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Re: The Enneagram Thread
« Reply #3 on: August 17, 2015, 09:31:48 PM »
Is there a specific example of this tests that is better/correct/canonical?

I ask because I've had four goes at these and got four different (very different?) answers ???

Brian

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Re: The Enneagram Thread
« Reply #4 on: August 18, 2015, 02:31:18 PM »
I am uncertain, will do some research.
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Spazmodic

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Re: The Enneagram Thread
« Reply #5 on: August 26, 2015, 12:51:28 PM »
My MBTI type has fluctuated too, but always around the Introversion/Extraversion axis and the Thinking/Feeling axis. Most often I test at INTP, second most often at INFP, and occasionally at ENFP. The fact is the MBTI is subject to our moods and our present sense of mastery. Nonetheless, it can reveal some solid truths about how we work best; I actually find my fluctuations to be the most informative thing about it, because it reveals a spectrum rather than an ossified, stratified personality type.

Never tried the Enneagram; I think I've avoided it because its name sounds like something you'd find on a tarot site.

Etudiant

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Re: The Enneagram Thread
« Reply #6 on: October 02, 2015, 04:49:19 PM »
Mitch, if you're interested in the Enneagram you can have a look here: https://www.enneagraminstitute.com/ which has a couple of free basic tests.  Once you have a bit of a shortlist of ideas, this is a great site: http://www.9types.com/descr/  Have a click through the types at the top...you'll probably find that there is one that really fits you...

Etudiant

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Re: The Enneagram Thread
« Reply #7 on: October 02, 2015, 04:54:55 PM »
I've been doing some slow research into things that provide long-term happiness and satisfaction and came across this interesting text for personal growth for type 7's:

•Recognize your impulsiveness, and get in the habit of observing your impulses rather
than giving in to them. This means letting most of your impulses pass and becoming a
better judge of which ones are worth acting on. The more you can resist acting out your
impulses, the more you will be able to focus on what is really good for you.
• Learn to listen to other people. They are often interesting, and you may learn things that
will open new doors for you. Also learn to appreciate silence and solitude: you do not
have to distract yourself (and protect yourself from anxiety) with constant noise from the
television or the stereo. By learning to live with less external stimulation, you will learn
to trust yourself. You will be happier than you expect because you will be satisfied with
whatever you do, even if it is less than you have been doing.
• You do not have to have everything this very moment. That tempting new acquisition
will most likely still be available tomorrow (this is certainly true of food, alcohol, and
other common gratifications—that ice cream cone, for instance). Most good opportunities
will come back again—and you will be in a better position to discern which opportunities
really are best for you.
• Always choose quality over quantity, especially in your experiences. The ability to have
experiences of quality can be learned only by giving your full attention to the experience
you are having now. If you keep anticipating future experiences, you will keep missing
the present one and undermine the possibility of ever being satisfied.
• Make sure that what you want will really be good for you in the long run. As the saying
goes, watch what you pray for since your prayers may be answered. In the same vein,
think about the long-term consequences of what you want since you may get it only to
find that it becomes another disappointment—or even a source of unhappiness.


I find that as I learn more about myself I've naturally been learning to do the things above. Ie, I've been focusing on limiting the hobbies/interests I start until I follow them through to a high level of competence.  Ie, I've been SCUBA diving for 2 years now, and intend on spending significantly more time becoming a technical/cave diver - but not rushing it :-).

As for external 'noise' and stimulus I've been slowly phasing out the amount of music I listen to...never really thought about it too much, but since I was 3 or 4 I've listened to music whilst sleeping.  So I'm reducing this as well.

Not having to have everything right now is challenging, and it's something I especially find difficult when it comes to food.  A recent win though: I'm going away SCUBA diving this weekend and wanted to take some photos...took some serious willpower not to drop $4000 on an underwater camera set-up!  I will buy this eventually as it's an extension of my photography and SCUBA hobbies but now isn't an approriate time - it'll still be an option in a few years time.

Spazmodic

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Re: The Enneagram Thread
« Reply #8 on: October 02, 2015, 08:01:52 PM »
I just took the short-form enneagram. My highest score is for type 5, second highest is type 4. I see that makes me "the Iconoclast." The descriptions I find about this type sound about right, in both positive and negative aspects. Also fits with my MBTI fluctuations (noted in my post above).

Cool stuff, Etudiant!