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Workouts, Exercise, and Health / Re: Workout program for you?
« Last post by Ozzy on January 28, 2017, 07:33:53 PM »
It's only been a couple months, but strength is already increasing, as is cardio endurance. 

My weight is still about the same, down a few lbs though, but I need to work the diet end of things a little harder, as I'd like to lose about 20-25 lbs to really be in optimal shape appearance wise.

Most boxes will let you go for free a few times, so if you want to check it out you should be able to do that without commitment.  At our box they have a masters & mobility class, which is aimed at the older crowd and focuses a little more on the mobility stuff and is slightly less intense.  Every box is different though, so google around and see what your town has to offer.

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Workouts, Exercise, and Health / Re: Workout program for you?
« Last post by Takeshi Kovacs on January 27, 2017, 09:09:09 PM »
I confess I know nothing about crossfit so that may become interesting to me at some point. I have a history of diluting my enthusiasm across too many areas so I tend to ration my exposure to potentially fun new stuff.

My swim gets me a changeable workout, whatever the coach has decided to inflict on us that day, I see the appeal in getting a  different workout handed to you every time you go. My gym time is very programmed and not variable at all.

Has crossfit helped with weight loss/muscle loss for you?
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Workouts, Exercise, and Health / Re: Workout program for you?
« Last post by Ozzy on January 27, 2017, 01:57:45 AM »
That plan looks pretty good.  Strength, cardio, mobility, good diet - hard to beat that.

You can do CrossFit with good form, but you have to want to...  Sure there's always that crazy guy wailing away on stuff, but he's probably 1/2 or more my age and has been athletic most of his life, unlike my sedentary self.   

I always scale weight down so I can do good form if there are a lot of reps, because I know, as a old dude, I've got to be careful about overdoing it.  I'm not going to the CrossFit games, so if I finish last, so be it...

The trick is that I'm still trying to learn how much to scale, how much to push, how intense to do the cardio related stuff so that I don't totally gas myself out in the first few minutes. 




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Workouts, Exercise, and Health / Re: Workout program for you?
« Last post by Takeshi Kovacs on January 27, 2017, 01:06:16 AM »
Nice Ozzy. The best possible workout is the one you're willing to do. I bet you're seeing some noticeable physical changes already with that schedule.

Crossfit looks cool but I'm old and pre-injured so very concerned with form not speed.

current workout/exercise:
* swim 2-3 sessions per week (1hr, ~3km per) usually Masters group with defined workout
* gym 3 sessions per week (1.5hrs), Stronglifts 5x5 and 25 min  stretches and planks for back
** upped my protein intake, pushed the lifts more and have put on ~15lbs of mostly muscle in the last couple months
* yoga 1-2 times per week (1hr per session)
* bike to work 15m each way, weather permitting

The yoga is somewhat new; found a good teacher and time and it's a form of physical meditation.

Gym I like to go really early if I can, like before 5am. Gym mostly empty no chit chat, no eye contact.

it's quite seasonal for me; swimming ramps up quite a bit at the expense of everything else as summer approaches.
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Workouts, Exercise, and Health / Workout program for you?
« Last post by Ozzy on January 24, 2017, 04:16:26 AM »
Trying to restart some discussions...so what are you doing for workout/exercise these days?

I started CrossFit in November '16.  I never really thought I'd be a crossfit type person, but I figured I needed something structured that would give me a good ass kicking every time, and it certainly fits the bill that way.  I've been at it for a whole two months now, which is probably longer than any other program I've done, so it's working :)

What I like:
1.  Structure - you show up, read the board, do the stuff, and you're done.  Not much thinking or planning required
2.  More structure - it's on a regular schedule, so M,W,F 6pm I know where I'll be.
3.  Variety - weight lifting, cardio, gymnastic stuff, misc stuff, not the same thing day after day, week after week
4.  Included training at the start with the on-ramp program to teach all the basic stuff before setting me loose in the main class
5.  Coaches always willing to help, answer questions, show the movements, etc.  Good and personable coaches at our box
6.  It's only an hour, so I'm in, I'm out and I know at the end I'll have gotten some sort of a good workout.



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Workouts, Exercise, and Health / Re: Exercise mental issue
« Last post by Mitch K on December 29, 2016, 09:46:18 PM »
Weird post, man. Sounds like a teenager wrote it.
Struggling psychologically last few days. Shit from my wife is screwing with my head.

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Implicit request for help. Statement that you never really liked doing the thing you are implicitly asking for help getting back to.
It's one of those situations people find themselves in like they detest going to work but need the money...

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You previously had a solid exercise routine. You recognized the value of fitness. Your routine has been disrupted with your new job, which is also more demanding than your previous job. (3 hours daily commuting, holy shit. I hope it's not driving.) Your level of fitness has decreased and the idea of getting back to it is daunting. You want to figure out how to get back to it.
It's driving. By the time I get home in the evening I can barely keep my eyes open. I'm out of the house for 11.5-12 hours per day. I know what you mean about getting it back, but actually what I'm asking is do I want to?

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I recommend that you decide what your goals are, then figure out the most efficient way to achieve them within your available window of time.
I cannot get as far as goals, beyond "do something", which is a problem in itself. My time window is realistically 30 minutes, including getting ready, and cleaning up afterwards. Honestly is this enough to achieve anything worthwhile? I ask because although I know much is made of small changes having big effects, my experience is that small changes have small effects, in the same way that five times a very small number is still a very small number.

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I find that "motivation" is a rare and transient thing. When it does appear I cultivate it carefully to start and build new habits. But the habits, properly established, are almost autonomous, like a riding a bus. No motivation required.

David Wong (Jason Pargen) has a good article around this general idea http://www.cracked.com/blog/5-ways-youre-sabotaging-your-own-life-without-knowing-it/  key point below:

Quote
You go to the doctor and he tells you that you have a bacterial infection that will never, ever go away. It will literally eat away a crucial part of your digestive system unless you do a chemical treatment twice a day, every day, and do painful semiannual follow-up treatments with your doctor ... for the rest of your fucking life. Sure, it's not a death sentence, but the sheer weight of it kind of makes you want to give up -- you can just see this burden stretching out in front of you, forever.

But, of course, I've just described brushing your teeth.

You don't regard dental care as a crushing burden, because you don't sit around every day contemplating the unfathomable mountain of teeth-brushing you must scale before you die. You only think of it as that thing you do in the morning because you have to, because you don't want your teeth to fall out. You manage the long-term goal (having teeth) by thinking only of the very manageable daily goal.
The difference is scale (pardon the pun!): I can sort my teeth in four minutes per day. I can fit in four minutes!  Four minutes of exercise is not considered enough to achieve any useful effect.
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Workouts, Exercise, and Health / Re: Exercise mental issue
« Last post by Takeshi Kovacs on December 29, 2016, 06:19:28 PM »
Weird post, man. Sounds like a teenager wrote it.

Implicit request for help. Statement that you never really liked doing the thing you are implicitly asking for help getting back to. And you'll never be as good as you were. And we're all gonna die.

Ok then. I'll address the implicit request and ignore most of the noise and pre-emptive rebuttal. And I'm not going to try to convince you of the value, because you know that already.

You previously had a solid exercise routine. You recognized the value of fitness. Your routine has been disrupted with your new job, which is also more demanding than your previous job. (3 hours daily commuting, holy shit. I hope it's not driving.) Your level of fitness has decreased and the idea of getting back to it is daunting. You want to figure out how to get back to it.

I suspect you'd have some solid advice if someone else said something like that to you.

I recommend that you decide what your goals are, then figure out the most efficient way to achieve them within your available window of time. Cardio? Your prior running routine may not be best, current research is showing interval training is pretty damn effective. Strength? Maybe body weight fitness is sufficient. Initially focus on form (actually doing it regularly) not content (how much you do) I generally do about an hour a day one of swim/weights+stretching/yoga but I have staged fallbacks depending on time available; 15 minutes of stretches and planks. Meditation 30m standard, I'll fall back to 10 if things are too disrupted.

I find that "motivation" is a rare and transient thing. When it does appear I cultivate it carefully to start and build new habits. But the habits, properly established, are almost autonomous, like a riding a bus. No motivation required.

David Wong (Jason Pargen) has a good article around this general idea http://www.cracked.com/blog/5-ways-youre-sabotaging-your-own-life-without-knowing-it/  key point below:

Quote
You go to the doctor and he tells you that you have a bacterial infection that will never, ever go away. It will literally eat away a crucial part of your digestive system unless you do a chemical treatment twice a day, every day, and do painful semiannual follow-up treatments with your doctor ... for the rest of your fucking life. Sure, it's not a death sentence, but the sheer weight of it kind of makes you want to give up -- you can just see this burden stretching out in front of you, forever.

But, of course, I've just described brushing your teeth.

You don't regard dental care as a crushing burden, because you don't sit around every day contemplating the unfathomable mountain of teeth-brushing you must scale before you die. You only think of it as that thing you do in the morning because you have to, because you don't want your teeth to fall out. You manage the long-term goal (having teeth) by thinking only of the very manageable daily goal.
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Workouts, Exercise, and Health / Exercise mental issue
« Last post by Mitch K on December 28, 2016, 11:52:32 PM »
I'm struggling. My fitness regime is currently non-existent. I'm at work 8.5 hours per day, plus three hours of commuting. Allowing time to sleep seven hours, then shower, eat, talk to my children and do basic chores I am in the position of wondering what hobby I enjoy I have to give up. I don't have a gym membership any more, mine was attached to my old job.

The real kicker is that I realize I never actually enjoyed exercising. I never got a runner's high, never got a rush from lifting or whatever. I enjoyed knowing I lifting slightly more than I was before. I enjoyed running further or faster than I had. I tried a shedload of different sports and apart from fencing detested them all. I got nothing out of being outside, the wind/sunshine etc.

Now I am seeing that that form of motivation is unsupportable long-term. At 50, I'm not going to be lifting ever more, running ever further and faster. I do not, and never have had, any intrinsic motivation to exercise. At best it is going to become an ever-greater chore for me, like doing an ever more revolting set of toilet cleaning or tax returns. I know I have to but how do I feel good about doing something that is going to become ever more difficult and onerous?

Oh, and don't anyone talk about survival and whatnot. We'll all be dead eventually no matter much we exercise.
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Introductions / Re: The demise of the MMSL forum and rebirth here?
« Last post by Mitch K on December 28, 2016, 06:10:20 PM »
Fuck all I can do, regarding improving it, since her behaviour doesn't change at all irrespective of what I do/ have done. Me being fit/unfit, involved/distant, employed/unemployed, active/passive has garnered no discernible change to how she acts. She is utterly fixated on her own view of the world.

I guess keep myself fit and walk out when the youngest goes to uni. She seems to think we are going to carry on this way, and move to Scotland in a few years. I've told her in words with few syllables that I'm not interested in living this way with her, anywhere, but she doesn't seem to hear or understand. Sex isn't on her radar except as a thing to avoid.
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Gadgets and Gear / Re: Smart HRM Bracelet
« Last post by Mitch K on December 28, 2016, 06:03:41 PM »
So it's perilously close to being a solution looking for a problem? Apparently it will tell me when I've missed a call on my phone. How it does this more efficiently than me having my phone in the chest pocket of my shirt all the time is a bit unclear. It will count steps (so will a pedometer from the pound shop) and make some kind of SWAG at calorie use. Tits on a fish, basically. I'm wearing it because it was a gift, but by the sound of things it would have been marginally higher on the list of things I would buy myself than a packet of tampons.
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